MASS TIMES

For the most up-to-date information concerning Mass cancellations, changes to the regular schedule, and more, please click here for the live liturgical calendar.


Unable to attend in person? Click here for all our digital content! Or for Communion to the homebound, click here.


ST. MARY'S CHURCH

Main Church at White Pine Canyon Road & Highway 224

English
Saturday: 5:30 PM
Sunday: 8 AM & 10:30 AM
Mon-Fri: 8 AM *Note: Mass on Wednesday, July 24, will be at the Old Town Chapel. Thursday Masses will be at the Old Town Chapel (121 Park Avenue), returning August 8.

Children's Ministry at most Sunday 10:30 AM Masses

Español
Domingo: 1 PM

Latin
Sunday: 3 PM


ST. LAWRENCE MISSION

English
Saturday: 5 PM
Sun: 10 AM
Mon & Thurs: 9:30 AM

Español
Domingo: 12 PM
Miércoles: 6 PM


OLD TOWN CHAPEL

Open daily for all to visit, pray at, and worship, St. Mary’s Old Town Chapel is the Oldest Catholic Church in Utah. It’s a special and revered establishment of the community, a precious reminder of our roots, and a landmark for our town. Learn more and support the Chapel at StMarysParkCity.com/Chapel.





CONFESSION

Also available by appointment

For the most up-to-date information concerning confession cancellations, changes to the regular schedule, and more, please click here for the live liturgical calendar

ST. MARY'S CHURCH

Tues: 4:30-5:30 PM
Thurs: 4:30-5:30 PM
Sat: 4:30-5:30 PM

ST. LAWRENCE MISSION

Mon: 10 AM
Wed: 5-6 PM
Thursday: 10 AM





ADORATION

For the most up-to-date information concerning adoration cancellations, changes to the regular schedule, and more, please click here for the live liturgical calendar.

ST. MARY'S CHURCH

Mondays 5-6 PM
Thursdays 8:30-9:30 AM *Note: Thursday Adoration in July will be at the Old Town Chapel (121 Park Avenue)
First Fridays 7 PM - Sat. 7 AM


ST. LAWRENCE MISSION

Wednesdays 5-6 PM






DIRECTIONS


ST. MARY'S CHURCH

1505 White Pine Canyon Rd
Park City, UT 84060
click here for directions

Visiting Hours
Daily: 7:30 AM - 6 PM


OLD TOWN CHAPEL

121 Park Ave
Park City, UT 84060
click here for directions

Visiting Hours
Daily: 7 AM - 7 PM


ST. LAWRENCE MISSION

5 S 100 W
Heber City, UT 84032
click here for directions

Visiting Hours
Mon - Thurs: 10 AM - 5 PM

If Church is closed, go to office.


THRIFT STORE

84 South 100 West
Heber City, UT 84032
(click here for directions)

Hours
Wed - Fri: 10 AM - 6 PM
Sat: 10 AM - 5 PM





SECOND SUNDAY OF LENT - FEBRUARY 25, 2024

See this week's bulletins.

ST. MARY'S BULLETIN ST. LAWRENCE BULLETIN

CELEBRATE SUNDAY

WITH ST. MARY'S

THE SECOND SUNDAY OF LENT

Turn your body into a vehicle for good.

SECOND SUNDAY OF LENT

Dualism has played a central role in the expression of religion since the beginning of human history. It seems to be ingrained within us to identify things either as belonging to ourselves or as things to which we belong, or as that which is outside of ourselves. We also tend to assign positive attributes to that with which we identify and negative attributes to that with which we do not. Life and Death, Good and Evil, Light and Darkness, etc. But there also seems to be a dualistic approach to the distinction between body and soul, where we consider the soul to be good and holy, and the body corrupt and predestined for evil. The very existence of Jesus Christ, and the fact that God chose to give Himself a body, ought to correct this misconception. The body is good and holy, we corrupted it, and now God offers to transfigure it for us.


READ THIS SUNDAY'S MESSAGE

The sanctity of the human body goes beyond Christ; within the story of Israel, there were plenty of prefigurements for the Incarnation. Consider this Sunday’s first reading, the well known story of the sacrifice of Isaac. We know that this story is meant to be a clear and obvious prefiguring of the person of Jesus Christ and his sacrifice on the cross: we have a human sacrifice taking place on wood, a father offering his son as that sacrifice, the one to be sacrificed carrying his wood up to the site of his sacrifice, the actual sacrifice of a ram being caught in a thicket like Christ wore the crown of thorns, etc. The initial approach to this scene might be the thought, why in the world would God ask Abraham to sacrifice his son, for whom he waited so long? In reality, the answer to that question is obvious: the religions of the time were incredibly familiar with human sacrifice, and the more difficult it was to offer someone, the more pious the sacrifice was considered. The only reason why we are appalled at the fact that Abraham would be willing to sacrifice his son is because at this moment, God avowed to His people that He does not desire human sacrifice. There is something precious about the human body that God desires to protect. We are told in the Church that Jesus Christ was like us in all things but sin; this means he still suffered the consequences of others’ sins. He was in pain, he hungered, he thirsted, he mourned, he was angry. And God desired for it to be so; if He were to come among us and not experience any of the trials and obstacles that have become typical of the human experience, he would not have been in true solidarity with His people, which was His goal from the very moment we first sinned. But through the trials and obstacles, through the pain, hunger, thirst, mourning, and anger, He offers us a way out. First it was through His own sacrifice, a Father who did not spare His own Son. Then, His resurrection, a fulfillment of the potential of the human body. Now, we can do it in our own sacrifices, especially those bodily sacrifices we focus on in Lent.


This Sunday’s Gospel speaks of the scene of the Transfiguration, when Christ’s body literally changed its figure, not its essence, to show a glimpse of what was to come. What was to come was not an exclusive Resurrection for Christ because of his divinity. The Transfiguration is a glimpse of what our own bodies are capable of undergoing - to be sanctified and to be so holy, it cannot separate from our souls. As St. Mary of the Assumption, our parish is founded upon the hope that we may all one day have our sanctified souls be reunited with our sanctified bodies, just as Mary did. Mary was a human. Moses and Elijah were human. Christ was human. They all had bodies, and used those bodies to serve God, not to be vehicles for sin. We do this by listening to Christ, just as his Father commanded us to do as we witnessed his transfigured body.