MASS TIMES

For the most up-to-date information concerning Mass cancellations, changes to the regular schedule, and more, please click here for the live liturgical calendar.


Unable to attend in person? Click here for all our digital content! Or for Communion to the homebound, click here.


ST. MARY'S CHURCH

Main Church at White Pine Canyon Road & Highway 224

English
Saturday: 5:30 PM
Sunday: 8 AM & 10:30 AM
Mon-Fri: 8 AM *Note: Mass on Wednesday, July 24, will be at the Old Town Chapel. Thursday Masses will be at the Old Town Chapel (121 Park Avenue), returning August 8.

Children's Ministry at most Sunday 10:30 AM Masses

Español
Domingo: 1 PM

Latin
Sunday: 3 PM


ST. LAWRENCE MISSION

English
Saturday: 5 PM
Sun: 10 AM
Mon & Thurs: 9:30 AM

Español
Domingo: 12 PM
Miércoles: 6 PM


OLD TOWN CHAPEL

Open daily for all to visit, pray at, and worship, St. Mary’s Old Town Chapel is the Oldest Catholic Church in Utah. It’s a special and revered establishment of the community, a precious reminder of our roots, and a landmark for our town. Learn more and support the Chapel at StMarysParkCity.com/Chapel.





CONFESSION

Also available by appointment

For the most up-to-date information concerning confession cancellations, changes to the regular schedule, and more, please click here for the live liturgical calendar

ST. MARY'S CHURCH

Tues: 4:30-5:30 PM
Thurs: 4:30-5:30 PM
Sat: 4:30-5:30 PM

ST. LAWRENCE MISSION

Mon: 10 AM
Wed: 5-6 PM
Thursday: 10 AM





ADORATION

For the most up-to-date information concerning adoration cancellations, changes to the regular schedule, and more, please click here for the live liturgical calendar.

ST. MARY'S CHURCH

Mondays 5-6 PM
Thursdays 8:30-9:30 AM *Note: Thursday Adoration in July will be at the Old Town Chapel (121 Park Avenue)
First Fridays 7 PM - Sat. 7 AM


ST. LAWRENCE MISSION

Wednesdays 5-6 PM






DIRECTIONS


ST. MARY'S CHURCH

1505 White Pine Canyon Rd
Park City, UT 84060
click here for directions

Visiting Hours
Daily: 7:30 AM - 6 PM


OLD TOWN CHAPEL

121 Park Ave
Park City, UT 84060
click here for directions

Visiting Hours
Daily: 7 AM - 7 PM


ST. LAWRENCE MISSION

5 S 100 W
Heber City, UT 84032
click here for directions

Visiting Hours
Mon - Thurs: 10 AM - 5 PM

If Church is closed, go to office.


THRIFT STORE

84 South 100 West
Heber City, UT 84032
(click here for directions)

Hours
Wed - Fri: 10 AM - 6 PM
Sat: 10 AM - 5 PM





TWELFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME - JUNE 23, 2024

See this week's bulletins.

ST. MARY'S BULLETIN ST. LAWRENCE BULLETIN

CELEBRATE SUNDAY

WITH ST. MARY'S

TWELFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME


Focus on what you are in control of, not what God is in control of.

TWELFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

When we experience the difficulties of life, our initial reaction is to blame God or to question His benevolent presence in our lives. More than anything, we as humans desperately want control of each moment, but so much of life is uncontrollable. Naturally, we consider that God must be in control of even the uncontrollable, and when those moments cause obstacles for us, we look for Him to solve them. It takes a while for a faithful believer to learn this, but this is not how God operates. Rather, He desires that we live according to the statement made famous in the serenity prayer - that we accept the things we cannot change, and the courage to change the things we can.


READ THIS SUNDAY'S MESSAGE

At the heart of the message of Christ, his teachings, his public ministry, and especially his miracles, is that we are entirely dependent on God, even for our salvation. However, this does not mean that we are entirely helpless or hopeless poor souls incapable of lifting a finger to make our lives better; God has given us the ability to move either towards Him or away from Him through the use of our free will. In a well-known moment in the life of Christ such as the calming of the storm that we hear about in this Sunday’s Gospel, Christ is attempting to teach his disciples a lesson. He does not calm uncontrollable storms for the sake of proving or showing off his authority over nature, but instead as a response to the despair of his disciples. They come to him, while he is calmly asleep in the stern. They don’t necessarily come to him out of humility or a desire for him to save them and protect them. They place a demand, even a blame, on Christ: “do you not care that we are perishing?” Christ’s calming of the storm is not a capitulation to this demand he do something, but a terse rebuke of their own faith. They were so concerned with their own safety in the middle of a frightening scene that they forgot something so simple, yet so important - Christ was in the boat with them. Had they perished, so would have Christ. If they had faith in him and in what he had been preaching up to this point, they would know that the Son of Man would not meet his end as a result of a natural event, which he can control. This is why he challenges them, by saying, “Why are you terrified? Do you not yet have faith?” This is the same message God gave to Job: why do we despair? Why do we blame God when the storms of life cause us to lose hope? Do we not know or remember that God is in control, that He wants us to trust Him, and that He is here with us in the midst of all turmoil?

The focus of Christ’s lesson in the calming of the storm, and even in God’s reassurance to Job, is written by Paul in his second letter to the Corinthians. Christ loved his followers. His death, the one reason he came into this world, was a death for the sake of all. Therefore, all of us, from those such as Job to the disciples to Christians today, have died to our old selves. No longer are we concerned with the fears of the unknown and the uncontrollable when their power is exclusively over our bodies. We are so much more than that; Christ was in the boat with his disciples out of solidarity so that we might be in glory with Christ in an elevated solidarity into which he invites us. We are now in his boat. The uncontrollable is only so for us, not for him. What an immense weight to be lifted off our shoulders, to let go of what we cannot control and to trust in the Lord. As we rest calmly in his boat, we become a new creation, free from the anxieties of this world. As Paul says, the old things have passed away and new things have come.